Remote Engineer. Odd-ball.
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NewsBlur now supports the new JSON Feed spec

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Introduced and announced only last week by open web pioneers Manton Reece and Brent Simmons, JSON Feed is a new RSS-like spec that lets websites publish their stories in a much easier and human readable format.

From the JSON Feed spec authors:

We — Manton Reece and Brent Simmons — have noticed that JSON has become the developers’ choice for APIs, and that developers will often go out of their way to avoid XML. JSON is simpler to read and write, and it’s less prone to bugs.

Starting today, NewsBlur now officially supports the new JSON Feed spec. And there’s nothing extra you have to do. This means if a website syndicates their stories with the easy-to-write and easy-to-read JSON format, you can read it on NewsBlur. It should make no difference to you, since you’re reading the end product. But to website developers everywhere, supporting JSON Feeds is so much easier than supporting XML-based RSS/Atom.

Daring Fireball, as pictured above, supports the new JSON Feed. To you, the reader, it should look no different than any other RSS feed. But to the developer, publishing this as a JSON Feed instead of XML is an order of magnitude easier and quicker.

This spec is a terrific effort by open web advocates to make it easier to keep the web open and free by lowering the cost to writing and publishing.

Try it for yourself, just subscribe to this feed: https://daringfireball.net/feeds/json. Even viewing it in a web browser is more pleasant than its XML counterpart.

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deezil
2 days ago
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@DigDoug Well here ya go!
Louisville, Kentucky
angelchrys
2 days ago
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Overland Park, KS
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5 public comments
seriousben
1 day ago
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The JSON feed spec looks promising. Looking forward to implement it.
Canada
jkevmoses
2 days ago
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This is why I pay money and support this feed reader. Great job! Thanks.
McKinney, Texas
ameel
2 days ago
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Yay!
Melbourne, Australia
chrisrosa
2 days ago
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good stuff from @newsblur #jsonfeed #rss
San Francisco, CA
wmorrell
2 days ago
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The commit to add support is so short; 56 lines to map json to the NewsBlur field names, a few more spots sprinkled with checks for 'json' with 'rss', 'xml', etc

My social media fast

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Last week (approx. May 7-14), I stopped using social media for an entire week. I logged out of all the sites and deleted the apps from my phone. I didn’t so much as peek at Instagram, which is, with Twitter and old-school Flickr, probably my favorite online service of all time. I used Twitter as minimally as I could, for work only.1 I didn’t check in anywhere on Swarm. No Facebook. As much as I could, I didn’t use my phone. I left it at home when I went to the grocery store. I didn’t play any games on it. I left it across the room when I went to bed and when I worked.

Many people have given up social media and written about it — the digital equivalent of the “Why I’m Leaving New York” essay — but since I didn’t write about leaving New York, I’m going to do this instead.

I used to be very good about using my phone and social media appropriately. More than a decade of working on kottke.org taught me how to not be online when I wasn’t working (for the most part). I tried super hard not to use my phone at all around my kids and if I was out with friends, my phone stayed in my pocket.2

Almost a year ago, after 13+ years in the city, I moved from lower Manhattan3 to rural Vermont. It’s beautiful here. I live in a house in the country surrounded by horse pasture and there’s great skiing in the winter. The nearest town is only five minutes away by car; it has a two-screen movie theater, a handful of restaurants (none of which are typically open after 10pm), two grocery stores, but nowhere to get a proper donut, sushi, or bowl of ramen. (The nearest ramen is an hour’s drive away.) While I was writing this post yesterday afternoon, the power in my house went out and didn’t come back on for three hours, forcing a delay in publication. It’s been difficult to meet people. Folks here are nice, but they mostly remind me of the people in the small town I grew up in (aka why I moved to the city in the first place). I work from home at a desk in my bedroom and some days, the only beings I’ll talk to are Siri, my landlord’s horses, and some days, my kids and their mom.

Social media, mostly through my phone, has been an important way for me to stay connected with friends and goings on in the wider world. But lately I’d noticed an obsessiveness, an addiction really, that I didn’t like once I became fully aware of it. When I wasn’t working, I was on my phone, refreshing Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook repeatedly in an endless series, like a little old lady at Caesar’s Palace working several slot machines at the same time. And I couldn’t stop it — my phone was in my hand even when I was trying to concentrate on my kids, watching a movie, or reading a book. So, I quit for a week to see what would happen. It’s not a super-long time period, but here’s what I noticed:

- Once I’d set my mind to it, it was pretty easy to go cold turkey. Perhaps my Twitter usage and keeping up with the news for kottke.org acted as a nicotine patch, but I don’t think so. Instagram was the toughest to stay away from, but I didn’t crack once.

- As the week went on, it was more and more evident that it wasn’t so much social media as the phone that was the problem. Even now, a few days after the conclusion of my experiment, I’m leaving my phone at home when I go out or across the room when I’m doing something. I’m going to try hard to keep this up.

- Buuuut, when you have kids, there is no such thing as giving up your phone. There’s always the potential call from their school or their mom or their doctor or another parent regarding a playdate or or or. I spend enough time online at my computer for work that I could mostly do without my phone, but with kids, that’s not really an option.

- Not a single person noticed that I had stopped using social media. (Not enough to tell me anyway.) Perhaps if it had been two weeks? For me, this reinforced that social media is actually not a good way to “stay connected with friends”. Social media aggregates interactions between loved ones so that you get industrialized communication rather than personal connection. No one really notices if a particular person goes missing because they’re just one interchangeable node in a network.

- My no-social week, for a variety of reasons, was probably the shittiest week I’d had in more than a year. Total emotional mess. Being off social media didn’t make it any better, but I doubt it made it worse. Overall, it was probably a good thing I wasn’t subjecting my friends and followers to self-subtweets and emo Instagram Stories…I was already scoring enough own goals without social media’s help.

- So, what did I do instead? I wish I could say that I had loads of extra free time that I used to learn Spanish, clean my house, catch up with old friends, cook delicious meals, and finish a couple work projects. Perhaps if shittiest week ever hadn’t been happening, I would have done some of that. Still, I did end up going to bed early every night, read a couple books, and had more time for work and dealing with kid drama.

After the week was up, I greedily checked in on Instagram and Facebook to see what I had missed. Nothing much, of course. Since then, I’ve been checking them a bit less. When I am on, I’ve been faving and commenting more in an attempt to be a little more active in connecting. I unfollowed some accounts I realized I didn’t care that much about and followed others I’ve been curious to check out. Swarm I check a lot less, about once a day — there was a lot of FOMO going on when I saw friends checked in at cool places in NYC or on vacations in Europe. And I’m only checking in when I go someplace novel, just to keep a log of where I’ve been…that’s always fun to look back on.

Mostly, I’ve resolved to use my phone less. Being on my phone was my fidget spinner…this thing that I would do when there was nothing else to do or that I would use to delay going to bed or delay getting out of bed in the morning. Going forward, I’m going to be more mindful about its use. If nothing else, my hands and thumbs might start feeling better.

  1. Yeah, I did not stop using Twitter. Ideally I would have, but Twitter is a huge source of information for this here website and I couldn’t afford to give it up without ditching work for a week, which I did not want to do because I wanted to maintain my normal schedule. But I didn’t look at Twitter on my phone, didn’t reply to or fave any tweets, muted some non-news/link accounts I follow, and limited my usage to “business hours”.

  1. Still one of my favorite tweets is from Scott Simpson: “My new standard of cool: when I’m hanging out with you, I never see your phone ever ever ever.”

  1. Haha, you’re getting a mini leaving NYC essay anyway. Suckers!

Tags: Facebook   Instagram   Jason Kottke   NYC   Swarm   Twitter   WWW
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deezil
6 days ago
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The way he talks about "the kids mom" and the crappy week... maybe he did well with the week away for other reasons.
Louisville, Kentucky
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mellangatang
7 days ago
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Wow, a whole week?!?
Whup Tee Doo...

Nobody cares.

Confederate Colony in Brazil in Santa Bárbara D'Oeste, Brazil

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An antique wagon is decorated with the Confederate flag during the annual Festa Confederada

As Confederate monuments are coming down in the Southern United States, even further south, in South America, the Confederacy lives on in a different way.

Every year, the Festa Confederada (Confederate Party) is held in Santa Barbara d’Oeste, north of São Paulo, to commemorate the Confederate ancestry of the approximately 10,000 to 20,000 Southerners who fled the U.S. for Brazil after the Civil War, establishing a colony that became known as Americana.

Known as "Confederados," they immigrated to Brazil between 1865 and 1885 rather than live under the influence of the Northern states or risk prosecution for treason. The Brazilian emperor Dom Pedro II, hoping to boost the country's cotton production, sweetened the deal by offering cheap land and a consistent way of life: Brazil was the largest importer of slaves in the Western Hemisphere and did not abolish slavery until 1888, the last country in the Americas to do so.

Over the generations, the ex-pats intermarried, became intermixed in the culture, and spread all throughout Brazil, while retaining some of the cultural traditions from the early United States. Portuguese is the dominant language at the Festa Confederada, but the festivities include traditional Southern dress—including hoop skirts and Confederate uniforms—food, music, and dancing on a floor decorated with the Confederate flag. 

The celebrations that take place each year at the Campo Cemetery, a.k.a "the Cemetery of the Americans" (originally founded because non-Catholic Confederados could not be buried in Brazil's cemeteries) celebrate this heritage. However, especially in today's political climate, the racial implications of celebrating the Confederate South can't be ignored. Some festival attendees don’t realize that the Confederate flag is a symbol of slavery and racism in much of the United States, while others hold that it signifies very different things in Brazil.

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deezil
7 days ago
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Wish they had taken more of the idiots with 'em.
Louisville, Kentucky
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Starbucks Registers Reportedly Down, Some Locations Giving Out Free Coffee

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If you were able to pick up your morning cup of joe from Starbucks today count yourself lucky, as some of the coffee chain’s locations were closed Tuesday thanks to a reported payment system outage. 

Starbucks customers began reporting the outage on Twitter Tuesday when they arrived at their local coffee shop only to find it closed or otherwise unable to do business.

While Starbuck itself hasn’t addressed the closures on Twitter, CNBC reports that the outage is tied to a failed system update.

“As part of our normal course of business, overnight we worked to install a technology update to our store registers in the U.S. and Canada,” the company said in a statement.  “A limited number of locations remain offline, and we are working swiftly to resume full operations in each of these stores.”

We’ve reached out to Starbucks for additional details. We’ll update this post if we hear back.

While several specific locations have posted signs noting that their systems were down, some customer expressed their frustration at showing up to closed stores to pick up mobile orders.

Still, not everyone left Starbucks empty-handed. Some customer reported that their local shops were giving away free coffee and food as an apology of sorts.





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deezil
9 days ago
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FFS. The coffee isn't even that GOOD! Go find a local place and support some small business today!
Louisville, Kentucky
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What did Donald Trump do today?He advised the graduates of Liberty University th...

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What did Donald Trump do today?

He advised the graduates of Liberty University that “nothing is easier—or more pathetic—than being a critic, because they’re people that can’t get the job done.”

Since taking office 114 days ago, and counting only things he has said on his private Twitter account, Donald Trump has criticized protestors, celebrities, CNN, the city of Chicago, Chelsea Manning, Mexico, the New York Times, the Washington Post, "Europe, and, indeed, the world," Sen. John McCain (R-NV) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) (jointly), Delta Airlines, Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY), Democrats (collectively), Nancy Pelosi, the Obama administration (collectively), UC-Berkeley, Iran, Arnold Schwarzenegger, the media, the United States (collectively), "this so-called judge" (James Robart), "any negative polls," "the horrible, dangerous and wrong decision" to suspend his Muslim ban, Nordstrom's, the time it took to reach a decision upholding the suspension of his Muslim ban, Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Chris Cuomo's interviewing skills, Sen. John McCain (R-NV) (individually), the upholding of the suspension of his Muslim ban, the legal system as a whole, Mark Cuban, leakers, Hillary Clinton, the NSA and the FBI (jointly), the US intelligence community (collectively), the Affordable Care Act, "liberal activists," the FBI (specifically), Barack Obama, "a reporter, who nobody ever heard of" (Trump biography author David Cay Johnston), North Korea, China, Germany, NBC, ABC, the Freedom Caucus, Bill Clinton, John Podesta, Reps. Mark Meadows (R-NC), Jim Jordan (R-OH), and Raul Labrador (R-ID) (jointly), "Sleepy Eyes" Chuck Todd, Susan Rice (via retweet, then later directly), people asking to see his tax returns, the "super Liberal Democrat in the Georgia Congressiol [sic] race" (Jon Ossoff), Canada, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (but he actually meant a non-appellate judge whose ruling would go to the Ninth Circuit), the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (for real this time), whichever president let the Civil War happen, Senate rules, then-FBI Director James Comey, Rexnord Corp., Sally Yates, and his own communications department--most of them more than once.

Why is this a bad thing?

  • Actually, it's good advice.
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deezil
11 days ago
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!
Louisville, Kentucky
angelchrys
11 days ago
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Overland Park, KS
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Linksys is making its first modem-router hybrid

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Generally speaking, there are two pieces you need to get internet working in your house or apartment: a cable modem, which is connected to a regular cable jack and outputs a wired Ethernet connection; and a router, which takes the wired connection of the modem and transmits the wireless internet you know and love.

Linksys, a networking company that makes both routers and modems, is now releasing a router / modem hybrid device that combines the two into one. While these kinds of devices aren’t exactly new, it is Linksys’ first shot at making one, and it could be a good option for people looking to avoid rental fees from ISPs or just hoping to cut down on cords in their living room. The AC1900 Cable Modem Router, as it’s called, supports...

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deezil
15 days ago
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They did this before. I owned it. WGC200 was the model number. They're still for sale on Amazon, just old as crap.
Louisville, Kentucky
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