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Is your cat plotting to destroy you?

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Ready to have your mind blown with a cool cat fact? Cats were not domesticated by humans—they domesticated us themselves. Around 8,000 years ago, the Mesopotamian ancestors of modern cats realized that humans enjoyed surrounding themselves with garbage and rats. Cats like both of those things, so they began invading…

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deezil
19 hours ago
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Yes.
Louisville, Kentucky
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deezil
1 day ago
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Louisville, Kentucky
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Technicalleigh
1 day ago
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YUP.
Vancouver BC

VICTORY

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by John Walters

It’s a seven-letter word that begins with the letter “V” and it has inspired plenty of talk about “a personal decision” and “sacrificing individual needs for national welfare.” It’s a polarizing word:

Vietnam

That’s right, Vietnam. What did you think I was talking about?

Imagine, if you will, a national crisis of sorts.

It is deemed good for American welfare if you soldier up and head over to the Mekong Delta and the thick jungles north of Saigon. This act of sacrifice for your country may very well cost you your life… but you must do it. Your country needs you.

But it’s a personal decision, you say. First of all, you don’t even know where Vietnam is. And you don’t have any reason, personally, to fight anyone from Vietnam. And they’re not even attacking our country. Our country is under no direct threat from Vietnam. And you want me to risk my life for this?

Yes

Yes, you must.

And what if I refuse? Will I lose my job?

Yes, probably, because we are going to imprison you.

But it’s a personal decision.

Uncle Sam does not see it that way.

*****

Nearly 60 years ago, communism and not Covid was deemed the existential threat (never mind that both emanated from Asia). And those who dared to refuse induction into the armed services were incarcerated while also labeled yellow.

Now here’s the big reveal: 1) The fate of Vietnam never directly impacted the national welfare of the United States and 2) Over the course of roughly a dozen years, some 68,000 Americans were killed in Vietnam.

Fast forward to 2021. Now, the national welfare of the United States is not terribly at risk due to Covid-19, but more than ten times as many Americans have died from it than died in Vietnam… in about 1/8 the time.

So it begs the question… why is something that has proven so much more deadly in so much less time allowed to flourish here on the basis that fighting it would compromise one’s freedom, and yet something that was so minor an existential threat to the U.S., relatively, treated as such a great crisis that not only were you forced to put yourself in far greater peril but that you were not even allowed the option of “it’s a personal decision?”

Why is the Vaccine so much more reviled than Vietnam (by a certain section of our nation)?

I think we know the answer… these people worship warfare and are intimidated by science. The former is easily explicable, even attractive, to them. The latter intimidates them.

The simple truth is that Vietnam was one-tenth as deadly as the pandemic and yet no man of draftable age was given the “it’s a personal decision” option. Because the war machine needs fuel to operate.

You’re praised for saying no to a needle. You’re pilloried for saying no to a machine gun.

This is America.

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deezil
2 days ago
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Louisville, Kentucky
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20211008

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deezil
7 days ago
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Louisville, Kentucky
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Things That Are OK in Addition to “Not Being OK,” According to Your Newly Minted Chief Wellness Officer

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1. COVID-19 and the related lockdowns have been hard on all of us. We want you to know: it’s OK to not be OK.

2. If you need to work through your lunch hour, that’s OK. In these unprecedented times, your energy levels can really fluctuate, and sometimes you’re just more productive if you work straight through lunch and don’t take any breaks. Just remember that it’s OK.

3. It’s OK not to schedule any vacation. It can be hard to imagine yourself going on vacation right now with all the travel restrictions, and we don’t want you to feel pressured. If you would feel more comfortable staying in town and working, that’s OK.

4. If you want to spend your former commuting time working instead of sleeping, that’s OK. Work from home has been an adjustment for everyone, and everyone uses this time differently. If you want to use that time to do extra work to give yourself some time back to better organize your work, that’s OK!

5. It’s OK to have trouble sleeping. We’re currently experiencing a great deal of anxiety as a culture, so if you’re finding you’re having trouble sleeping, that’s OK. Also, if your phone dinging with notifications until one a.m. is keeping you up, try going to bed later, it’s OK.

6. If you’d rather knock out a meeting instead of eating dinner, that’s OK. The new flexibility afforded by working from home lets us structure our workday however we like, and if you’d rather conduct a meeting than eat dinner, that’s OK.

7. If you ever need to skip therapy because of a client emergency, it’s OK. Sometimes, it’s better to just take a step back and let your mind focus on something else, like correcting a logo size on a banner, and that’s OK.

8. If you feel like not going to the gym on the weekend and just taking it easy on a conference call on your couch on Sunday afternoon instead, that’s OK. Working from home offers that flexibility, and if you want to use that flexibility to take it easy and sit on a three-hour call instead of going to a workout class you had to book six days in advance because everything is at fifty percent capacity, that’s OK!

9. It’s OK to do nothing. The state of the world right now can be overwhelming, and if you just feel like lying around and doing nothing after you’ve completed all your work and the work of all your former co-workers that resigned, that’s one thousand percent OK.

10. It’s OK to feel too exhausted to think about the future. Things like planning social events with friends, looking for other employment, etc., can be a huge mental drain that, quite frankly, you don’t need right now. If you feel too exhausted to do anything other than just work, we just want you to know that is totally OK.

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angelchrys
7 days ago
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Overland Park, KS
deezil
7 days ago
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Louisville, Kentucky
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Time Lapse Map of Covid-19’s Spread Across the US, 2/2020 to 9/2021

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Using data from Johns Hopkins, this time lapse video shows the spread of Covid-19 across the US from Feb 2020 to Sept 2021. This looks so much like small fires exploding into raging infernos and then dying down before flaring up all over again. Indeed, forest fire metaphors seem to be particularly useful in describing pandemics like this.

Think of COVID-19 as a fire burning in a forest. All of us are trees. The R0 is the wind speed. The higher it is, the faster the fire tears through the forest. But just like a forest fire, COVID-19 needs fuel to keep going. We’re the fuel.

In other forest fire metaphorical scenarios, people are ‘kindling’, ‘sparks being thrown off’ (when infecting others) and ‘fuel’ (when becoming infected). In these cases, fire metaphors convey the dangers posed by people being in close proximity to one another, but without directly attributing blame: people are described as inanimate entities (trees, kindling, fuel) that are consumed by the fire they contribute to spread.

See also A Time Lapse World Map of Every Covid-19 Death (from July 2020).

Tags: Covid-19   death   infoviz   maps   time lapse   video
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deezil
9 days ago
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We were so close so many times to the end of this. If we had the vaccine doses and a mandate in place mid-June, I think we could have really put a quell on what happened the past 6 weeks.
Louisville, Kentucky
cjheinz
9 days ago
Yes. June 2021 was The Month When I Thought We Were On The Other Side. Oops, no such luck.
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