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Some People

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Some people feel helpless & anxious.

Some people are bored.

Some people are self-quarantined alone and are lonely.

Some people are realizing that After will be very different from Before.

Some people are really enjoying this extra time with their kids and will miss it when it’s over.

Some people just got off their 12th double shift in a row at the hospital and can’t hug their family.

Some people visited their favorite restaurant for the last time and didn’t realize it.

Some people have died from COVID-19.

Some people can’t stop reading the news.

Some people cannot afford soap.

Some people are learning how to bake bread.

Some people are working from home while simultaneously trying to homeschool their kids.

Some people are single parents trying to work from home while simultaneously trying to homeschool their kids.

Some people are living paycheck to paycheck and the next one will not arrive.

Some people are unfit to be President.

Some people left the city for their home in the country.

Some people can’t go to the grocery store because they’re at risk.

Some people lost their jobs.

Some people can’t sleep.

Some people are watching free opera online.

Some people have been quarantined for weeks.

Some people can’t work remotely.

Some people have contracted COVID-19 and don’t know it yet.

Some people can’t concentrate on their work because of anxiety.

Some people can’t afford their rent next month.

Some people are still gathering in large groups.

Some people are keeping the rest of us alive at significant personal risk.

Some people didn’t buy enough hand sanitizer.

Some people bought too much hand sanitizer.

Some people are missing their therapist.

Some people can’t go to work but are still being paid by their employers. For now.

Some people are mainly concerned about what to watch next on Netflix.

Some people are volunteering.

Some people are going to lose their business.

Some people are realizing that teachers are amazing.

Some people are ordering takeout from local restaurants.

Some people would really just like a hug.

Some people can’t convince their elderly parents to take this seriously.

Some people are worried about their 401K.

Some people have never had a 401K.

Some people will face increased abuse at home.

Some people are going to get sick or injured and will have a harder time getting medical care.

Some people can’t buy the food they need because the WIC-eligible stuff is sold out.

Some people won’t stop partying.

Some people lost their childcare.

Some people are doing everything they can to remain calm and hopeful and it’s not working.

Some people are watching Outbreak & Contagion and playing Pandemic.

Some people don’t know what they’re going to do.

Some people are overwhelmed with advice on how to work from home.

Some people are drinking or eating too much.

Some people are thinking about after.

Some people are upset because they can’t travel.

Some people are horny.

Some people are planning for a larger garden this year.

Some people won’t see their families for months.

Some people are logging off to stay grounded.

Some people can’t see the light at the end of the tunnel.

Some people will realize they need to split with their partner.

Some people are singing Imagine.

Some people aren’t on this list.

These are all based on the experiences of real people drawn from news stories, social media, and friends. Take heart: you are not the only person experiencing what you are going through. But be mindful: not everyone is having the same experience you are. Ultimately though, we are all in this together.

Tags: COVID-19
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minderella
15 days ago
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deezil
17 days ago
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Louisville, Kentucky
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DMack
13 days ago
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some people think it's called a "corn teen"
some people are still using cellular data despite being at home
some people are actually using that much toilet paper
Victoria, BC

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis for Sun, 15 Mar 2020

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Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis on Sun, 15 Mar 2020

Source - Patreon

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zippy72
21 days ago
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FourSquare, qv
deezil
21 days ago
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Louisville, Kentucky
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Child’s Play

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Meet Donny and Tony, a couple of kids from the outer boroughs. Donny grew up in Queens and made his money in real estate and grifting. Tony is from Queens and became a doctor. Both are in their seventies, Tony being about five years older.

For the past three years Donny had the most important job on the planet. Now Tony does, but Donny is sorta his boss. Tony is a very intelligent guy, extremely mature. Donny is bombastic and we think he can read.

Now here’s the thing. Donny is being faced with the most existential crisis this country has faced at least since 9/11, perhaps since World War II. And he’s called in Tony to help since Tony is better-equipped to tackle the problem than anyone alive. There’s just one problem: at least half of Tony’s job is managing Donny. Maybe more.

See, as we’ve already noted, Tony is very smart. He’s good at reading people. And what he knows is that Donny respects two things and two things only: money and power. And for Donny nothing is out of bounds—not lies, not crimes, nothing—in the pursuit of those two goals. Tony, on the other hand, has devoted his life to helping and healing people. He’s actually worked much harder and taken jobs that pay way less in order to help people. That’s who he is.

Now here’s another thing that Tony knows about Donny: that this man is completely tethered not only to self-gratification, but also to immediate self-gratification. It’s why he stages these rallies nearly every week. He doesn’t do it because he wants to be reelected, although he does. He feeds off the high he gets from the adulation. Finally, late in life, he’s able to bathe in this naked approbation.

So Tony knows this about Donny. Meanwhile, he’s been put in charge of tackling this pandemic thing, which is a word people probably needed to define for Donny some time within the last month.

Donny wants the stock market to remain high. If the market is high, he can say that the economy is great (the greatest ever), and that will get him reelected, and then he can spend four more years staging rallies and feeding off the love. That’s power.

As far as Donny is concerned, he needs this pandemic to go away as soon as possible so that it doesn’t interfere with this incredible bull market. But Tony knows that it doesn’t work that way. He tries to explain to Donny that the only way this goes away is with a vaccine, and that won’t come until a year from now, which is after the election.

So Donny says, “Well, we can speed it up, right? We’re America. We can get one of those vaccines out in a few weeks?” No, Tony says. Vaccines don’t work that way. There are clinical trials yada yada yada and Donny’s already moved on the the next idea.

“Okay, if we can’t get a vaccine quickly, then we can just keep the numbers down.” What? “Keep the numbers down. If people don’t get tested, then there’s no proof that they had this virus. So that’ll keep the numbers down.”

But what happens when people begin dying by the hundreds and thousands? “People die of the flu every year, right? People die of pneumonia. That’s what they died of.”

Tony is in a jam. He believes that the best way to help America is to be spear-heading this presidential task force. But he also understands that his boss’ primary concern is not taking care of people; it’s making the disease disappear (even if it hasn’t) so that the stock market will climb back toward 30,000.

“All those people in hospitals?” Fake news.

“All the deaths overseas?” That’s their problem.

Tony’s not anti-capitalist. Somewhere on his priority list, probably lower, he’d like to see the stock market climb as well. But Tony understands highly infectious diseases. He understands terms such as “flattening the curve” and “exponential.” And what he’s trying to convince his boss, who only understands immediate gratification, is that they must be transparent about this virus and that they must be candid with the American people about what needs to be done.

In the short run that means the economy will literally grind to a halt in a way that none of us have ever seen, at least not beyond a few days. And that will tank the market further, in the near term. But if we don’t take those measures, the numbers of cases and deaths will be exponentially higher.

Donny counters, “Unless we don’t let people get tests. Even though we say they can.”

But the media will unearth the disparity between what we say and what is happening. Doctors and nurses will talk. The cover-up will be everywhere.

“I’ll just keep saying, ‘Fake News,'” Donny says.

Tony tries to persuade his boss that it’s like that old commercial line from the auto mechanic: You can pay me now or you can pay me later. Tony says that it’s better to take the pain now because ultimately the pain will be fractional as to what it might’ve been. Donny simply doesn’t understand. If he can just tell enough lies to keep America optimistic, if he can placate the public at least until early November, that’s all that matters to him. And by the way, why do all these media outlets have to keep updating the number of cases and deaths. Who’s giving that information to them? We need to stop that.

Tony really wants to help America. But his boss only traffics in self- and immediate gratification. Tony knows that the only effective measure against this virus, until a vaccine is developed, is to mandate that Americans go into exile, so to speak. To shut down culture, crowds and most of the economy.

To get as many people tested as possible. Whereas Donny wants to have as few people tested as possible, himself included.

Tony is in a jam. As were General Kelly, General Mattis, etc. He doesn’t really believe in this president, and he knows that Donny’s behavior is actually horribly counterproductive. But Tony thinks the best way for him to help is to be the president’s resident expert. If only Tony can get Donny to see that it’s the disease that needs to be tackled, not Wall Street. But Donny doesn’t care. Because he doesn’t care about people. He cares about wealth. And power. And satisfying himself.

Two guys from the outer boroughs. Two very different lives lived. Two entirely different sets of values. Donny’s the boss. And Tony’s his fixer. But Tony knows that Donny is part of the problem, perhaps the biggest part of it outside of the virus itself. And Donny only wants to hear about lower numbers, not about how much it will cost or how long it will take.

How long will this marriage last? Anyone’s guess.

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deezil
22 days ago
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Louisville, Kentucky
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Once a Republican… ‘Get a little mad with me!’

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I remember when my French teacher found out that I was a member of the Young Republicans group in high school. He saw it in the yearbook and asked me about it quizzically, and when I told him that I was a devout Republican, he smiled and said, “No, you’re not.” I didn’t let that sway me, but the memory stayed with me. He knew my heart.

I registered Republican as soon as I could legally register to vote. I came from a hyper-conservative Christian upbringing. I went to various Republican events as a young woman. I started out my adult life voting Republican. We give the internet and social media a lot of crap for not being as useful as we would have hoped but… without it all, I’d still be pretty much in the dark about what goes on in our government, world politics and the issues people face that I’m protected from by my culturally acceptable appearance and choice of religion and marriage.

When I started out voting Republican, I started doing what I saw as my civic duty; I researched the candidates. I went down a rabbit hole of voting records, bill sponsorships and campaign donations. I spiraled down a path of reading through public records detailing government spending and reports from independent watchdog groups citing irresponsible bookkeeping (that never made it into mainstream discussion). I came out of that tunnel completely horrified.

The Republicans I thought were pro veterans kept shooting down bills to expand veteran benefits, citing a lack of funds, but they would increase the military budget again and again and again, with the Pentagon engorged, wasteful and lining the pockets of contractors who contributed to some of the campaigns of those very politicians. I got to read my tax breakdowns. I looked at the sliver that went to help families in need when I was taught to be resentful of those families for relying on my money. What I found were giant corporations relying on my money. What I found was government bloat relying on my money.

The predators of my money and yours didn’t turn out to be poor families after all. They were very rich people who stayed rich and got richer on our dime and our hard work and had the gall to tell us there wasn’t enough money to go around. Thanks to social media, I listened to a diverse group of people who became more and more diverse in my efforts to find people to listen to, to learn from. For example, I didn’t understand the issues, the nuances of society, that people of color faced every day of their lives. If you’re white, I recommend joining groups on Facebook where POCs can speak freely, and I recommend you don’t say a word.

Don’t ask questions.

Don’t voice your own opinion.

Don’t try to be a white savior.

Listen.

Vote accordingly. There are no voiceless who need your voice. There are oppressed who need you to stand behind them.

I’m not a fan of abortions. I’m not pro-abortion. I don’t want abortion clinics on every corner or for women to use abortion as birth control. And, you know what’s a relief? Not having to make up my mind against a false narrative but making up my mind with the facts. John Irving helped a lot there, too, philosophically. Yet, here Republicans were, voting against access to birth control, sex education and healthcare — all of the things that would actually lower abortion rates. Hmmm.

Democrats don’t have all the answers either, I know.

I switched parties because I figured out I was a bleeding heart liberal all along. Since the Republicans weren’t actually fiscally conservative or in favor of small government as they had claimed to be, I decided to leave them in the dust. I would be interested in a system with more parties to serve the important issues for more varied viewpoints.

If you’re still with me at this juncture, I needed to get all of this out to say: Talking about politics and social issues on the internet does work. I know it can be annoying. I know it’s disruptive. I know it gets heavy. I know you’ll lose friends. However, the alternative is not rocking the boat and allowing other people to live in the consequences of your apathy.

If you are white, cisgendered, heterosexual and Christian, it is very comfortable and easy to settle into a life of passionless voting and avoidance of the news, because, for the most part, your life will remain unaffected. I would urge you to empathy, to compassion, to knowledge and to anger if you’re willing to take part. Angry people are motivated people and they fix problems. Get a little mad with me (at billionaires and status quo politicians, not the downtrodden). We have so much to fix.

I love you.

Kate English, 31, is a Louisville business owner and mother.

The post Once a Republican… ‘Get a little mad with me!’ appeared first on LEO Weekly.

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angelchrys
25 days ago
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Overland Park, KS
deezil
25 days ago
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Louisville, Kentucky
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Nancy by Olivia Jaimes for Thu, 05 Mar 2020

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Nancy by Olivia Jaimes on Thu, 05 Mar 2020

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deezil
32 days ago
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Louisville, Kentucky
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Trump Doesn’t Care If You Catch Coronavirus

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Now that the virus is here in Trump’s America, it can enjoy the freedom it so dearly craves

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deezil
34 days ago
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Louisville, Kentucky
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